Cookies

Like most websites The Pathologist uses cookies. In order to deliver a personalized, responsive service and to improve the site, we remember and store information about how you use it. Learn more.
Outside the Lab Profession, Training and education

The Enemies of Pathology

As I read the “Preaching Beyond the Choir” editorial in The Pathologist, it triggered my personal fears about choosing pathology as my future career. As a fourth-year medical student in Europe, I can feel the lack of appreciation from my peers as I express my desire to pursue pathology in the future. People still in training do not seem to perceive this extraordinary field to be as “noble” or “challenging” as the clinical or surgical specialities, and that puts a tremendous amount of pressure on people like me, who find pathology not only intellectually challenging, but probably the most diverse field of medicine as a whole.

And there, in our lecture halls and hospital wards, lies the greatest enemy of pathology – peer pressure. It’s an inescapable fact that, even if great and successful pathologists (like my extraordinary pathology teacher, Gabriel Becheanu) teach us about their work and empower us to pursue this field, the ignorance of peers tramples the enthusiasm of many potential pathologists and diverts them from a future that might impact their – and their patients’ – lives in a purely positive way.

Bring them closer to you by sharing information that for you is elementary, but for them is groundbreaking.

With regards to patients and their understanding of pathology and laboratory medicine, leaflets and notes on pathology reports won’t do much, in my humble student opinion. What I think we need to do is adapt. My suggestion? YouTube. Medical education channels run by pathologists that, through well-known topics (such as polyps, Barrett’s esophagus, and common cancers) educate patients on diseases that are familiar to most, yet whose diagnosis unquestioningly relies on the input of the pathologist. Help people understand what you do by improving their overall understanding of medicine. Teach them about your field by explaining to them why you are so important in so many ways. Bring them closer to you by sharing information that for you is elementary, but for them is groundbreaking. Then they will see and respect you as you deserve.

Through initiatives like these, I hope that the future of your field (and hopefully mine as well in a couple of years!) is as extraordinary as the work you put into your diagnoses day in and day out.

Enjoy our FREE content!

Log in or register to gain full unlimited access to all content on the The Pathologist site. It’s FREE and always will be!

Login

Or register now - it’s free and always will be!

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Pathologist magazine
Register

Or Login via Social Media

By clicking on any of the above social media links, you are agreeing to our Privacy Notice.

About the Author

Andrei-Mihai Borcan

Fourth-year medical student at “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania.

Register to The Pathologist

Register to access our FREE online portfolio, request the magazine in print and manage your preferences.

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Pathologist magazine

Register