Cookies

Like most websites The Pathologist uses cookies. In order to deliver a personalized, responsive service and to improve the site, we remember and store information about how you use it. Learn more.
Subspecialties Microbiology and immunology, Microscopy and imaging, Clinical care

The Problem of Filarial Disease

Filariasis is a major global cause of health problems. Transmitted via flies or mosquitoes, filarial disease can affect cutaneous, ocular, or lymphatic tissues. Diagnosis is established by observing microfilariae in peripheral blood and skin snips; their characteristic morphologic features not only help with diagnosis, but also provide insight into the pathogenesis of disease.

The term “filariasis” may seem remote to some – but for others in the medical field, it is far too close to home. Filariasis refers to a group of neglected tropical diseases caused by nematodes of the superfamily Filarioidea, transmitted through arthropod vectors. These diseases are classified as lymphatic or cutaneous/ocular filariasis based on which tissues are the primary home of adult worms (1). It is estimated that over 120 million people are infected worldwide, 40 million of whom are disfigured or incapacitated by the disease. The social, psychological, and economic burden of filariasis – amounting to a loss of 2.8 million Disability Adjusted Life Years annually (2) – is clear. The World Health Organization has committed to eliminating lymphatic filariasis as a public health problem by 2020 – and river blindness, a cutaneous/ocular form of the disease by 2025 – by i) mass drug administration in endemic regions and ii) targeting the vectors to halt transmission (3,4). However, even regions that have eliminated filariasis may see its re-emergence due to travel in and out of the area (5).

Read the full article now

Log in or register to read this article in full and gain access to The Pathologist’s entire content archive. It’s FREE!

Login

Or register now - it’s free!

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Pathologist magazine

When you click “Register” we will email you a link, which you must click to verify the email address above and activate your account. If you do not receive this email, please contact us at [email protected].

About the Authors

Harsh Mohan

Former Professor and Head of the Pathology Department, Government Medical College and Hospital, Chandigarh. He currently serves as Senior Consultant Pathologist at Oncquest Laboratories, Paras Hospitals, Panchkula, Haryana, India.


Poonam Bhaker

Consultant Pathologist at Oncquest Laboratories, Paras Hospitals, Panchkula, Haryana, India.

Register to The Pathologist

Register to access our FREE online portfolio, request the magazine in print and manage your preferences.

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Pathologist magazine

Register