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Outside the Lab Profession, Training and education

Examining the Entrance to Elysium

At a Glance

  • In the UK, pathologists at all stages of their careers have observed a backlog of alented trainees making it into practice
  • Many have cited difficulty in passing the FRCPath Part 2 examination as the primary cause
  • Trainees have identified problems with the structure, content and marking of the examination, or with the conditions under which the test is taken
  • Though RCPath has taken in feedback from their examinees and seen an increase in pass rates, for many issues, no clear way forward has yet been agreed

In order to enter the Greek underworld, the souls of the dead must first pass through its gates, which are guarded by the multi-headed hellhound Cerberus. The discipline of pathology in the United Kingdom is much the same – only in this case, Cerberus takes the form of the Fellowship Examination of the Royal College of Pathologists (FRCPath) Part 2.

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About the Author

Michael Schubert

While obtaining degrees in biology from the University of Alberta and biochemistry from Penn State College of Medicine, I worked as a freelance science and medical writer. I was able to hone my skills in research, presentation and scientific writing by assembling grants and journal articles, speaking at international conferences, and consulting on topics ranging from medical education to comic book science. As much as I’ve enjoyed designing new bacteria and plausible superheroes, though, I’m more pleased than ever to be at Texere, using my writing and editing skills to create great content for a professional audience.

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