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Outside the Lab Biochemistry and molecular biology, Clinical care, Laboratory management, Microbiology and immunology, Point of care testing, Profession, Regulation and standards

A Septic Shock

Sepsis. A diagnosis that strikes fear into the heart of anyone who knows how severe it can be and how quickly it can worsen. And because sepsis is becoming more prevalent, new protocols have been issued for its management; for example, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ (CMS) Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Early Management (SEP-1) bundle (1). One recommendation is serum lactic acid level measurement within three hours of severe sepsis presentation, and again within six hours if the initial measurement is elevated. Is this a practical goal – and, if so, why and how should it be implemented? To learn more, we spoke to Matthew Churpek and Xuan (Susan) Han – authors of a study revealing that many patients don’t have these measurements taken (2).

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