Cookies

Like most websites The Pathologist uses cookies. In order to deliver a personalized, responsive service and to improve the site, we remember and store information about how you use it. Learn more.
Inside the Lab Precision medicine, Genetics and epigenetics, Biochemistry and molecular biology, Technology and innovation

Preventive Genomics Clinics: The Future of Precision Medicine?

Personal genetic testing is here to stay – so Bethany Zettler and Renée Pelletier recommend preventive genomics clinics as a way to offer the testing patients want without bypassing the guidance they need to fully understand their results.

Since the turn of the millennium, we have made great progress in understanding how hereditary differences in DNA impact an individual’s risk of issues such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Today, thanks to the recent rise in direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing, it has never been easier to access your own genetic information. It is estimated that, by 2021, 100 million people will have used a DTC genetic test (1), setting the market on track to be worth US$6.36 billion by 2028 (2). But as the number of people who want to discover their own genome increases, so does the need to educate consumers about the implications of their results. This is something that two health systems in Boston are now aiming to address with the introduction of their own preventive gene sequencing clinics.

Brigham and Women’s Hospital’s Preventive Genomics Clinic provides comprehensive genome sequencing, interpretation, and risk reporting to healthy adults and children. “We discovered that 15–20 percent of apparently healthy people have a strong genetic risk factor for disease – and nearly everyone carries recessive traits that could lead to serious disease in children,” says Bethany Zettler, Genetic Counselor and Project Manager. “Preventive genomics is an important milestone in shifting medicine from a reactive, treatment-based model to one where illness can be prevented.” More recently, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) launched their own Preventive Genomics Clinic, which brings together genetic counselors, clinical geneticists, and physicians to offer personalized testing and treatment plans based on genomic interpretation.

Read the full article now

Log in or register to read this article in full and gain access to The Pathologist’s entire content archive. It’s FREE!

Login

Or register now - it’s free!

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Pathologist magazine

When you click “Register” we will email you a link, which you must click to verify the email address above and activate your account. If you do not receive this email, please contact us at [email protected].

About the Author

Luke Turner

While completing my undergraduate degree in Biology, I soon discovered that my passion and strength was for writing about science rather than working in the lab. My master’s degree in Science Communication allowed me to develop my science writing skills and I was lucky enough to come to Texere Publishing straight from University. Here I am given the opportunity to write about cutting edge research and engage with leading scientists, while also being part of a fantastic team!

Register to The Pathologist

Register to access our FREE online portfolio, request the magazine in print and manage your preferences.

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Pathologist magazine

Register