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Diagnostics Point of care testing, Microbiology and immunology, Clinical care

Smarter, Faster Sepsis Testing

Sepsis robs millions of people of their lives each year, but because its symptoms overlap with those of several other medical conditions, even well-trained medical professionals can have trouble recognizing it. Unfortunately, this confusion contributes to the condition’s high mortality rate; every hour of delayed treatment increases the patient’s risk of death by 8 percent (1). It is estimated that sepsis may affect over 30 million people around the world each year, causing as many as six million deaths (2). In some countries, it is one of the leading causes of death among patients who die in hospitals. And although sepsis most often occurs among patients who are already hospitalized for kidney, lung, or urinary tract infections and other problems, it can just as easily arise in the community setting, where the likelihood of a timely diagnosis is even lower.

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About the Author

David Ludvigson

David Ludvigson is President and CEO of Nanomix, Emeryville, USA.

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