Cookies

Like most websites The Pathologist uses cookies. In order to deliver a personalized, responsive service and to improve the site, we remember and store information about how you use it. Learn more.
Diagnostics Genetics and epigenetics, Precision medicine, Oncology, Biochemistry and molecular biology, Omics

A Personalized Reality

At a Glance

  • Molecular tumor profiling of clinically actionable mutations using NGS guides the delivery of anti-cancer therapies
  • Fast, efficient and cost-effective, targeted NGS is becoming increasingly embedded into the clinical laboratory
  • Certain factors are vital for accurate clinical data, such as quality control, FFPE sample compatibility and an optimized target capture assay
  • Targeted panels are emerging and evolving in response to the latest genetic discoveries

Clinically actionable mutations lying within certain driver genes are central to tumor development, and hold much utility for cancer medicine. While these mutations carry diagnostic, prognostic or predictive implications, a subset are also deemed ‘druggable’ – able of identifying cancers that can be treated with targeted therapies acting against the subsequent protein product or disturbed pathway.

Read the full article now

Log in or register to read this article in full and gain access to The Pathologist’s entire content archive. It’s FREE and always will be!

Login

Or register now - it’s free and always will be!

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Pathologist magazine
Register

Or Login via Social Media

By clicking on any of the above social media links, you are agreeing to our Privacy Notice.

About the Authors

Matthew Smith

As principal clinical scientist at the molecular pathology diagnostic service, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Trust in the UK, Matthew has worked for the past nine years in clinical genetics laboratories, specializing in molecular pathology, which has included working on a number of next generation sequencing projects, focusing on solid tumors.


George Burghel

George was awarded a PhD in cancer genetics from the University of Sheffield, UK, before completing a three year clinical scientist training programming with Yorkshire Regional Genetics Services. He is now working as a higher specialist trainee clinical scientist at the Manchester Centre for Genomic Medicine in the UK

Register to The Pathologist

Register to access our FREE online portfolio, request the magazine in print and manage your preferences.

You will benefit from:

  • Unlimited access to ALL articles
  • News, interviews & opinions from leading industry experts
  • Receive print (and PDF) copies of The Pathologist magazine

Register